Power and Vulnerability: Black Girl's Magic in Black Women's Science Fiction

Jalondra A Davis

Abstract


#Blackgirlmagic has become a mode of digital resistance against the devaluing of black women and girls. But it has also raised criticism by black feminists who question the political potential of its focused on glamorized, and often commercialized black femininity, its ableism and centering of beauty and, most of all its reinscription of a strong black woman narrative that trivializes black women’s pain and demands their labor rather than addressing the conditions that necessitate their allegedly superhuman strength (Hobson, 2016). This analysis of Black women’s science fiction proposes a different consideration of magic and Black girls, and identifies an archive of BlackGirlMagic that locates power within vulnerability and otherhuman possibility.

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